Frequently Asked Questions

What is the One Happy Camper Program?

The One Happy CamperProgram is a partnership of the Foundation for Jewish Camp and communities across North America.In Rochester, theFarash Institute for Jewish Education is the local funding partner that administers the One Happy Camper grant program. One Happy Camper grants of up to $1800 are available to children in the greater Rochester area who wish to attend Jewish overnight camp for the first time.

What are the eligibility criteria for One Happy Camper grants?

One Happy Camper Rochester grants of $1800 are awarded to first-time campers who attend a nonprofit Jewish overnight summer camp for 19 consecutive days or more. $1000 One Happy Camper grants are awarded to first time campers who attend nonprofit Jewish overnight camp for 12-18 days. Eligible campers must be entering grades 2-12 and be attending one of the 150+ non-profit, Jewish, overnight summer camps which can be found on the Farash Institute website at the following link. http://www.farashinstitute.org/Default.aspx?RD=4689 This includes Camp Seneca Lake, Camp Ramah, Camp George, Camp Eisner, and dozens more across North America. Campers must reside in one of the following New York counties: Monroe, Wayne, Ontario, Yates, Seneca, Livingston, Wyoming, Genesee, Orleans. Campers must consider themselves Jewish.

Is One Happy Camper a needs-based program?

No. One Happy Camper Rochester provides incentive grants to encourage children to attend overnight Jewish camp for the first-time. It is not a scholarship fund and is not based on need. Our goal is to engage families who are considering sending their children to camp and, in effect, to give them $1,800 off their camp fee to try a Jewish one.

How do families apply for a One Happy Camper grant?

The first step is to register the child at camp. In order to be eligible for a grant, the child must be registered at a Jewish summer camp listed on the Foundation for Jewish Camp’s eligible camp’s list. Once campers are registered for camp, parents should apply for the grant through the Farash Institute website www.farashinstitute.org Once the child’s registration at camp has been confirmed and the grant application has been approved, funds will be paid directly to the camp listed on the application and will be credited to the family in the form of a tuition deduction. If the family cancels the child’s registration at camp, the funds will be returned to FJC and the partnering organization.

Can more than one child per family apply for a grant?

Yes.

Can a family receive financial aid in addition to a One Happy Camper grant?

Yes. One Happy Camper program grants are non-needs based grants. This is not a scholarship. As such, receiving a grant does not preclude the family from receiving scholarship aid from another source. To view an online directory of over 80 scholarships, please visit www.jewishcamp.org/scholarships. Camps also maintain their own lists of scholarships and can provide additional assistance.

Is there a deadline to apply for a One Happy Camper grant?

There is no deadline.

How long will it take to be notified that a grant application has been approved?

Families should allow up to four weeks for confirmation of the grant approval.

Why should parents consider a Jewish camp for their children?

Jewish overnight camp is fun! It is so much more than campfires and color war. Kids love camp because it is a magical place where they can be accepted for who they are. Summer camp fosters independence, builds self-esteem, creates lifelong friendships, and enhances an appreciation of the great outdoors. It transforms the lives of young children by providing them the opportunity to be immersed in a culture that is truly unique.

Jewish overnight camp is packed with action: boating, basketball, filmmaking, rock climbing, cooking, archery, yoga, painting, drama, dance—you name it! Ruach (spirit) is part of every activity. Campers are bunkmates, team players, artists, athletes, problem solvers and blossoming leaders. Songs and activities are often tied to intrinsic Jewish values like community, kindness and an appreciation for giving back. Jewish overnight camp celebrates Judaism in a fun and non-threatening way. Jewish experiences at camp excite and inspire campers. The impact of overnight Jewish camp is immediate and lasting. Studies show that children who go to Jewish camp are more likely to become adults who value their heritage, are engaged in their communities, support more causes, and take on leadership roles throughout their lives.

What is PJ Goes to Camp? How is it different from One Happy Camper?

PJ goes to Camp is a marketing initiative to inspire PJ Library members, alumnae and siblings to consider nonprofit Jewish overnight camp. While the majority of the PJ Library members are still too young to attend overnight camp, this initiative is designed to do two things: (1) set the stage so that when the PJ Library member is of camp age, Jewish camp is at the forefront of the conversation; (2) encourage older siblings to consider Jewish camp.

A part of the PJ Goes to Camp marketing initiative are PJ Library One Happy Camper grants. These grants, funded by the Foundation for Jewish Camp and the Harold Grinspoon Foundation, are restricted to first-time campers who are members, siblings or a member or alum of PJ Library and who do not live in a community that is currently sponsoring its own community-wide OHC program.

As of September 2015, any family residing in Monroe, Wayne, Ontario, Yates, Seneca, Livingston, Wyoming, Genesee, or Orleans counties will now receive grant funding exclusively through One Happy Camper Rochester, a program of the Farash Institute for Jewish Education. PJ Goes to Camp is only available to families who do not reside in the counties listed above.

Who do I contact for more information about One Happy Camper Rochester?

Contact Sharon Gray, Program Coordinator for the Farash Institute for Jewish Education sgray@farashinstitute.org or 585-434-2700 x-203.

Girls laughing during Jewish teen overnight camp
Boys play tennis during Jewish overnight camp